I am glad you are enjoying reading about this unique wedding! Here’s part 2 and it starts with a description of the bridal trousseau. An Indian Wedding
An Indian Wedding
The Rabari tribe from Gujarat inspired the design and style of the wedding dress. Roopali accessorized by adding a mirror work shawl from Dastkar Haat Samiti and a unique Rabari work shawl by a very renowned artist from the Gaatha online store.

An Indian Wedding

An Indian Wedding

An Indian Wedding

An Indian Wedding

It’s fair to say that the jewelry is a very, if not the most, important part of an Indian bride’s trousseau. Roopali realized that to do justice to the beautiful, handcrafted clothes, she would have to add jewelry that complemented the artisanal nature of her trousseau. “When your clothes are made with so much love, it is almost unfair to team it up with imitation jewelry and other accessories and hence was born my idea of the “Artisan Bride”. I decided that everything I wear at my wedding would be artisan made. My research led me to Aprajita Toor of We Desi who works with local artisans to create unique footwear. Together, we designed shoes for 3 of my outfits inspired by Kolhapuri chappals and juttis from Punjab. For the wedding day, I bought Dhokra jewelry from Orissa and teamed it up with some gold jewelry from both my mom and my husband’s mom. I bought the other jewelry from FabIndia and Central Cottage Emporium. I wish I had the time to explore more traditional jewelry options but, unfortunately, I could not. I have created a great information base about some really great jewelry designers and plan to reach out to them sometime in the future”- Roopali Bahal

An Indian Wedding

The bride’s enthusiasm for creating an artisanal wedding was infectious and the rest of the family pitched in to do their part. For wedding favors, the families gave away organic Khadi products and gifts exchanged among family members included Madhubani baskets and trays.An Indian Wedding
An Indian Wedding
In all, Roopali Bahal’s wedding incorporated the work of artisans and designers from at least 8 different Indian states and with some of the traditions dating back seven generations. Roopali’s ideas aren’t restricted to just the Indian culture or to occasions like weddings. With a little bit of planning, each one of us can help in the preservation of traditional arts and crafts in cultures around the world. So as to inform and to obtain support for traditional arts and crafts, Roopali has shared her resource list that will help you make your next occasion a more special, handcrafted celebration! If you have any further questions, please email her at roopalibahal@gmail.com.

An Indian Wedding

Image credits: Shutterdown Photography


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